The Baha’i Faith in Egypt blog includes in a recent post the US state department’s report on Egypt, which condemns Baha’i human rights abuses within the country. The report notes:

Members of non-Muslim religious minorities officially recognized by the Government generally worship without harassment and maintain links with coreligionists in other countries; however, members of religious groups that are not recognized by the Government, particularly the Baha’i Faith, experience personal and collective hardship.

[...]

The Government again opposed advances in the respect for religious freedom affecting Baha’is. A government appeal of an April 2006 decision by the Administrative Court, which had supported the right of Baha’i citizens to receive ID cards and birth certificates with religion noted on the documents, resulted in a December 16, 2006 decision to overturn its ruling, and maintained the government prohibition on Baha’i citizens obtaining identity cards.

[...]

Tradition and some aspects of the law discriminated against religious minorities, including Christians and particularly Baha’is. The Government also continued to deny civil documents, including identity cards, birth certificates, and marriage licenses, to members of the Baha’i community.

[...]

Specifically, the Embassy and other State Department officials raised concerns with the Government about ongoing discrimination faced by Christians in building and maintaining church properties despite Decree 291 of 2005, official discrimination against Baha’is, and the Government’s treatment of Muslim citizens who wish to convert to other faiths.

[...]

The non-Muslim, non-Coptic Orthodox communities ranged in size from several thousand to hundreds of thousands. The number of Baha’is is estimated at 2,000 persons. The Jewish community numbers fewer than 200 persons.

[...]

In addition to complaints by Christian citizens to the NCHR, there were also 14 complaints from Baha’is, one of which was signed by 51 complainants who sought the right to have their religion listed on official papers.

[...]

The Government continued to deny civil documents, including ID cards, birth certificates, and marriage licenses, to members of the Baha’i community.

Read the rest of the report here.